An Awesome Tool That Makes People Read Your Email

Chances are your customers have email 🙂 !
The average office worker receives 121 emails every day. I know, that number seems low to me too. Often the email load seems overwhelming.

Getting too many emails is a real problem. Over the last couple of years, we have seen a lot of ways and tools appear that try to help us manage this flood of emails better. Spam filters are becoming more powerful and more ruthless all the time. Gmail and other tools have taken it upon themselves to sort your incoming mail in important and “promotional” emails.

There is a growing gap between email senders that want and need to get their emails seen, read and acted upon and email recipients that need to manage the daily workload emails create.

How To Keep Your Emails Out Of The Spam Filter

Keeping your email out of the spam filters is one of the most challenging things in email marketing and increasingly in regular communications as well.

In an attempt to protect us from getting too much spam, email and Internet Service providers are applying more advanced filters to eliminate those emails that seem to be low quality to the end user. Of course, there is no human that opens every email and decides if it is spam or not. But because an email is a digital file, it can be analyzed. The filters also look at what reputation the domain has and what server the email is sent from.

There are many elements that influence email deliverability and some of those are quite technical. A lot depends on the reputation of your domain and your email provider.

Email newsletters have been especially hard hit by the fight against spam. Sophisticated filters and things like the Gmail “Promotions” tab keep our readers from ever seeing our emails.

But there are ways and best practices we can apply that help get the emails delivered and opened.

I invite you to listen to my interview with Nicole St. Germain from the ConvertKit customer success team who has a lot of valuable advice about how to design and write your email.

Don’t Get Caught – Canada Anti-Spam Legislation and LinkedIn

This post was first published on May 11 2014 and I updated it today, January 20 2015   On July 1, 2014 Canada’s Anti – Spam Legislation (CASL) went into effect and brought clarity about the definition of SPAM to Canadians . The considerable fines give it some teeth while some of the interpretations will probably keep a […]

Using The Constant Contact Autoresponder

Disclaimer: I am an Authorized Local Expert of Constant Contact. The content below should apply to all professional email marketing tools. Marketing automation does have a pretty bad reputation and not without reason. However, using the right tools like an autoresponder series or scheduling Social Media updates can actually improve the customer experience, lead to more […]

The Constant Contact Toolkit – 20minute.academy

I hope you all had a great summer! This is the first fall session of the 20minute.academy As of today these sessions will take place once a week – every Wednesday at 9am Pacific. In today’s session, I introduce the new Constant Contact Toolkit- as a pilot for the upcoming webinar series. With Toolkit Constant Contact […]

Creating a CASL Compliant Email Signature – 20minute.academy

In between all the webinars and seminars I teach about CASL I focus on email marketing with Constant Contact. My recent posts focus on Social Media tools and CASL Don’t Get Caught – Canada Anti-Spam Legislation and LinkedIn Using Facebook Profiles For Business Means Breaking The Law But even our regular emails fall under the […]

Using Facebook Profiles For Business Means Breaking The Law

Let me make sure we are talking about the correct face of Facebook (many are confused about this): Your Profile is where you connect with your personal friends. To see each other’s updates you have to mutually opt in by accepting a “Friend request”.
This is very different from using a Facebook Page that is openly visible for anybody and we can subscribe to (commercial) updates by “liking” the page. As long as your Facebook Page clearly states the type of commercial updates the subscriber will receive, you are safe.